Carl Solomon on NOT Publishing Jack Kerouac
Apr05

Carl Solomon on NOT Publishing Jack Kerouac

The following is from an interview with Carl Solomon, conducted by John Tytell in 1973. John Tytell’s collected interviews (with Ginsberg, Burroughs, Corso, Solomon, and Holmes) and essays on the Beat Generation will be published by Beatdom Books in 2014. Tytell is also the author of Naked Angels (one of the first books that took the Beats seriously as a literary movement) and Paradise Outlaws. * John Tytell: I understand that...

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Why Can’t They Get It?
Feb23

Why Can’t They Get It?

By Neil Reddy Originally published in Beatdom #14   There are two questions that have to be asked about Beat movies. What do we want and why can’t they get it right? If we’re looking for Beat movies as in expressions of the flow and rhythm of Beat poetry and Jazz Bebop, then you have to go to the source material: Pull My Daisy (1959), or The Flower Thief (1960), or Howl (2010). If you want to get derivative, try any college arts...

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Go… the Summer, Fall, and Winter of Discontent
Feb12

Go… the Summer, Fall, and Winter of Discontent

The summer, the fall, and the winter of discontent, shovel after shovel of snow that turns to filthy slush, as in slush pile (publishers’ slush piles) . . . the discontent of youth, the discontent of marriage, the discontent of writers, the discontent of New Yorkers, and the discontent that turns to temporary joy at the nightclub The Go Hole. “Go! Go!” and “gone.” The discontent of life right from the beginning, as whimsically stated...

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Jack Kerouac’s On the Road Retold by Google Maps
Feb09

Jack Kerouac’s On the Road Retold by Google Maps

There have been more than a few artists from across various media attempt to bring something new to Kerouac’s classic road novel. One element that particularly fascinates is the map . We are forever being shown new interpretations of his journeys, with each artist highlighting some different theme. Gregor Weichbrodt has a very new take – he has attempted to turn Kerouac’s story into a set of directions as told by...

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Marlon Brando Not a Beatnik
Nov22

Marlon Brando Not a Beatnik

  Back in 1959, the year that the Beats moved into the world of film with Pull Your Daisy, and MGM decided that the group made excellent Hollywood fodder, starting with The Beat Generation and moving on with The Subterraneans, Marlon Brando was busy denying any relationship with Kerouac and co. (Click on image for larger view.) The next issue of Beatdom will center around the relationship between the Beats and film, and includes...

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American Hipster: A Life of Herbert Huncke
Nov11

American Hipster: A Life of Herbert Huncke

From: While the name Herbert Huncke may not be well-known among the general population, it is certainly familiar to readers of the Beat Generation. You simply cannot tell the life story of Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs, or Jack Kerouac without it, and he appears quite obviously in some of their most important works, including Junky, On the Road, and “Howl.” These three writers, among the most important in American literature,...

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The Second Wave of American Interest in Japanese Culture: Alan Watts, Jack Kerouac, and Gary Snyder
Oct14

The Second Wave of American Interest in Japanese Culture: Alan Watts, Jack Kerouac, and Gary Snyder

by Charlie Canning Photos by John La Farge and David S. Wills   Since the Treaty of Kanagawa in 1853, the United States and Japan have had a long and varied history. Initially, the United States wanted trade with Japan to extend American influence in Asia as well as to compete with Britain, Russia, and France. These were mercantile and political concerns that had little to do with Japan as an extant civilization with something to...

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A Soft Old Book with Handwritten Notes as Memento of a Life
Sep26

A Soft Old Book with Handwritten Notes as Memento of a Life

“Be always a poet, even in prose.” Charles Baudelaire Yesterday, I inherited a first-edition (1961) paperback Baudelaire by Pascal Pia published by Grove Press with notes written in the hand of my beloved brother-in-law who died at the age of fifty-six of dreaded Alzheimer’s disease, an excruciating four-year battle. He was born on September 5, 1957, the day On the Road was published and proclaimed by Gilbert Millstein in The New York...

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