Archives For john tytell

New Beat Generation Books 2017

Later this month, Cambridge University Press is releasing The Cambridge Companion to the Beats, which features essays by Jonah Raskin, Regina Weinreich, Nancy Grace, Erik Mortenson, Kurt Hemmer, Oliver Harris, Brenda Knight, Hillary Holladay, Ronna Johnson, Polina MacKay, and others. From the Amazon listing:

Consummate innovators, the Beats had a profound effect not only on the direction of American literature, but also on models of socio-political critique that would become more widespread in the 1960s and beyond. Bringing together the most influential Beat scholars writing today, this Companion provides a comprehensive exploration of the Beat movement, asking critical questions about its associated figures and arguing for their importance to postwar American letters.

Continue Reading…

In the above video, Beatdom Books author John Tytell talks with Martin Torgoff, whose new book, Bop Apocalypse, explores jazz, drugs, and Beat literature.

Tytell is the author of The Beat Interviews and his next book, Beat Transnationalism, will be released later this year.

Exciting New Books Coming in 2017

I’m delighted to announce that Beatdom Books has agreed to publish new titles by John Tytell and Robert Johnson. John Tytell wrote one of the first serious books about the Beat Generation, Naked Angels, in 1976 and we published a collection of his interviews and essays in 2014. Robert Johnson’s The Lost Years of William S. Burroughs: The Beats in South Texas was a huge influence on me and inspired me to write my own book, Scientologist! William S. Burroughs and the ‘Weird Cult’. I’m truly honored to be tasked with editing and publishing their new books. Continue Reading…

Beat & Beyond Festival

If you’re anywhere near New York next weekend, you should be thinking about going to the Beat & Beyond Festival. From Friday, June 3rd to Wednesday 6th the Howl! Happening Gallery is hosting a “Six-Day Celebration Honoring the Poets, Musicians, Bookstores, and Significant Individuals Whose Voices and Energy Transformed America Forever.” The line-up for this series of events is an impressive who’s who of Beat knowledge, including two Beatdom Books authors – Eliot Katz and John Tytell. Continue Reading…

The Burroughs Millions

In Search of the Origin of Burroughs’ Mythical Trust Fund

From Beatdom #16

William S. Burroughs was always quick to observe that, thanks to the novels of Jack Kerouac, he had been saddled with the reputation of being a rather wealthy man. He once explained to an audience:

I have never been able to divest myself of the trust fund that [Kerouac] foisted upon me. I mean there isn’t any trust fund. There never was a trust fund. When I was not able to support myself… I was supported by an allowance from my family… my hard working parents who ran a gift and art shop in Palm Beach, Florida, called Cobblestone …

But you see Kerouac thought a trust fund was more interesting and more romantic. Let’s face it there was a very strong Sunday supplement streak in his mind. And he also saddled me with a Russian countess. Well, she was a bit easier to get rid of than the trust fund. And he nurtured the myth of the Burroughs millions. There are no Burroughs millions except in the company. And the family got nothing out of it… Continue Reading…

Reconsidering the Importance of the Joan Anderson Letter

It’s been an exciting few years for fans of the Beat Generation. Since Beatdom was founded, we have seen the release of a number of high profile movie adaptations (including Howl and On the Road), the publication of previously unpublished Beat works like The Sea is My Brother, and various major anniversaries (including the fifty years that have passed since Howl and On the Road were published, as well as the centenary of the birth of William S. Burroughs). Perhaps as a result of these events we have witnessed a revival of interest in the Beats, and as such a plethora of new critical works on their lives and art. Beat studies is thriving and the Beats are gaining respect as an important part of literary and cultural history. Continue Reading…

Coming Soon: The Beat Interviews

We are delighted to announce that John Tytell’s book, The Beat Interviews, will be released on October 18th by Beatdom Books. 

 

About the Author:

John Tytell (born May 17, 1939) is an American writer and academic, whose works on such literary figures as Jack Kerouac, Ezra Pound, Allen Ginsberg, Henry Miller, and William S. Burroughs, have made him both a leading scholar of the Beat Generation, and a respected name in literature in general. He has been a professor of English at Queens College, City University of New York since 1963. He was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize for his Ezra Pound: The Solitary Volcano (1987).

 

 

About the Book:

In The Beat Interviews, John Tytell speaks with Beat Generation luminaries Herbert Huncke, John Clellon Holmes, William S. Burroughs, Carl Solomon, and Allen Ginsberg about their lives and the lives of their contemporaries. These groundbreaking interviews were conducted in the 1970s and are collected here together for the first time. In addition, the author has gathered essays giving insight into the style and philosophy of the Beats, elucidating upon the interviews to provide a unique comprehensive overview of the Beat movement.

 

About the Publisher:

Beatdom Books was founded in 2007. This small, independent press has published books about the Beat Generation, such as Larry Beckett’s Beat Poetry (2012), David S. Wills’ Scientologist! William S. Burroughs and the ‘Weird Cult’, Philip Willey’s Naked Tea: The Burroughs Bits, and Marc Olmsted’s Don’t Hesitate: Knowing Allen Ginsberg ’72-’97. It also publishes a small number of fiction and poetry titles, as well as the internationally acclaimed Beatdom literary journal.

 

 

Early Commentary:

Tytell is a great companion.  Here at the top of his form he celebrates the Beats with his all-encompassing sensitivity to the major writers.  Tytell’s deep commitment and warm personal insights shine through The Beat Interviews.

– Ann Charters, author of Kerouac: A Biography, and editor of Kerouac: Selected Letters 1940-1956.

 

Just when we thought there was nothing more to say about the Beat Generation, John Tytell’s new book is refreshing.  At the heart of the book are his interviews, conducted when the key figures were alive and talking.  The straightforward Q and A format allows us to hear their distinctive voices before they were edited and tidied up as literary history.  It is rare to be able to enjoy the oral voice so clearly.

– Steven Watson, author of The Birth of the Beat Generation.

 

In addition to being one of the country’s leading scholars in the field of Beat Studies, John Tytell was intimate with most of the era’s major literary figures.  That fact alone makes these interviews indispensable.  He has interspersed insightful essays throughout this exceptional collection of interviews, to reveal each writer as a truly unique individual.  Nevertheless they somehow merged to form one of America’s greatest generations of authors.  Tytell’s enlightened and unsurpassed approach makes for worthwhile reading and is a researcher’s dream.

– Bill Morgan, author of The Beat Generation in San Francisco: A Literary Guide and editor of Howl on Trial: The Battle for Free Expression.

 

It is wonderful to start the book with Huncke and so nice to also read and therefore be in the same room with Carl. And the second Chapter The COOL World sets up Holmes interview, and is really important stuff. And all the essays in the book are really well done and INTERESTING!! So if this new book can excite an 83 year old, imagine what a gift this book will be to younger folks!!

– David Amram, author of Offbeat: Collaborating with Kerouac.

 
If John Tytell’s new book were merely a re-visit to these stars of the Beat Generation from an earlier time, The Beat Interviews would be a valuable reminder of who they were to anyone interested in this unique counter cultural literati. But, this slim volume is so much more. Interwoven with the writers’ first hand accounts, Tytell’s sharp analysis, honed by decades-long scrutiny, updates the record and corrects the revisionism as time moves farther from the facts. The impulse to mythologize, inherent to the Beat movement, is busted here, and the truth is so much more exciting. Now that the beat writers have
entered history, this book is essential reading for understanding their lives and literature, from a critic who was there from the beginning.

– Regina Weinreich, author of Kerouac’s Spontaneous Poetics, editor of Kerouac’s Book of Haikus, and co-producer/director of the documentary, Paul Bowles: The Complete Outsider.

 

John Tytell’s The Beat Interviews, a rich collection of some of the raw material behind Professor Tytell’s considerable scholarship, offers a first-hand focus on significant Beat Generation figures Herbert Huncke, John Clellon Holmes, William S. Burroughs, Carl Solomon, and Allen Ginsberg.  Though several of them have taken on a larger-than-life status, their interviews offer an inescapable sense of their personal presence: Huncke talks to us with his “midnight mouth,” Burroughs gives us his unadorned Factualist truths, and Ginsberg shares personal recollections and literary insight on Burroughs himself…. A sixth “interviewee” is John Tytell, whose commentaries on each author are so conversationally written we’re certain he too is seated close, talking to us.

– Gordon Ball, author of East Hill Farm: Seasons with Allen Ginsberg and Allen Verbatim: Lectures on Poetry, Politics, Consciousness.

 

John Tytell’s Beat interviews are particularly illuminating because he has always known the right questions to ask. Like all his valuable work on the Beats, starting with the ground-breaking Naked Angels, this book reflects a profound and informed understanding of their place in American literature, their cultural importance and the tumultuous lives they lived.

– Joyce Johnson, author of Minor Characters and The Voice is All.

Carl Solomon on NOT Publishing Jack Kerouac

The following is from an interview with Carl Solomon, conducted by John Tytell in 1973. John Tytell’s collected interviews (with Ginsberg, Burroughs, Corso, Solomon, and Holmes) and essays on the Beat Generation will be published by Beatdom Books in 2014. Tytell is also the author of Naked Angels (one of the first books that took the Beats seriously as a literary movement) and Paradise Outlaws. Continue Reading…

Barry Miles and John Tytell Discuss William S. Burroughs

Marking the 100th anniversary of the birth of William S. Burroughs, Barry Miles – a friend of the late, great American author – has put together the definitive biography of the man’s life. In this video John Tytell, author of Naked Angels, one of the first books about the Beats, talks to Miles.

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M7ql2VXIoWk

Burroughs on Filming The Great Gatsby

John Tytell: They are making a movie of The Great Gatsby.

William S. Burroughs: I’m sure it will be a real mess.

JT: But not at the box office.

WSB: I’m not even sure of that. Generally speaking they know what they’re doing, but they don’t always. They will go all out on these spectaculars that don’t work at all. I was just looking the book over myself with an idea of making a film, and there just is no film there — everything’s in the prose. You take that away and you’ve got wooden dialogue and creaky action… It isn’t cinematic.

William S. Burroughs talking about filming The Great Gatsby in 1974.