Archives For christmas

Dostoyevsky’s Heavenly Christmas Tree

For “electronic laser TV generations that don’t read Dostoyevsky” quoth Allen Ginsberg

Fyodor, Fedor, Feodor
Dostoevski, Dostoievsky, Dostoevskii, Dostoevsky, Dostoyevsky was a psychologist, pardon, novelist
His Christmas story is about a six-year-old boy, perhaps younger than six
The boy is in a great city
Alone with a sick mother
In a cold damp cellar
Starving
He touches his mother
So cold is she
Dead cold
It’s dark in the cellar
And the boy is haunted by barking from a ferocious dog
He ventures up to the unknown street

He recalls thousands of barking howling packs of dogs in his home town
In this unknown place, stone streets are frozen with snow
Steam hangs from the mouths of horses
A policeman turns to avoid him

Another street
This one lit by lights
And a glass window with a marvelous tree
Decorated with toys and apples and many lights
Pretty children dressed in best clothes play
And on a table yellow, red, and almond cakes
A lady hands him a kopek
But it rolls away
And he cries, poor wretched little, little boy
Another glass window
With dolls dressed in green and red
So real he laughs
A big wicked boy knocks him down
So he hides behind a wood stack
He warms up
Sleeps
And hears his mother sing

A soft voice calls, “Come to my Christmas tree”
A bright light!
Another tree, like he’s never seen
Bright
With boys and girls flying
They kiss him
His joy-filled mother laughs

This is the Christmas tree of Christ
For children frozen
Foundlings
Suffocated
Starved
Died of bad air
Angels and crying mothers
Flying, kissing, and happy children

“The Heavenly Christmas Tree” was written by Fyodor Dostoyevsky in 1876.

Beatdom Books on Kindle

It seems that one of the hottest Christmas presents this year was a shiny Kindle gift card. It’s really a great idea. There are a ton of wonderful publications on Kindle these days and they can be downloaded in a matter of seconds. But the problem is – as always – what to buy, of the many, many titles out there.

Well, call us biased, but we think that Beatdom Books has some great options. Of course, there are issues of Beatdom magazine – well, only issues nine and ten. These contain some brilliant essays, short stories, and poems, so there’s a little something for everyone. What’s more, they’re dirt cheap! A copy of Beatdom on your Kindle will set you back around a dollar.

If you’re looking for a novel to curl up with over the coming cold months, think about David S. Wills’ The Dog Farm, a rum-soaked romp from the “wrong side of the world”. It’s the second biggest story from the Korean peninsula in 2010, beaten only to the punch by the death of a tyrant.

For a shorter, weirder read, take a look at Spencer Kansa’s debut novel, Zoning. A tale of magic and madness from a warped world, this wild ride will keep you glued to your Kindle all night. Beat fans will probably know Kansa from his interviews with legendary Beat figures, including his friend, William S. Burroughs.