Beatdom’s 48 Hour Spring Sale

To celebrate spring, we’re have a flash sale that will last for the next 48 hours. Buy a copy of Eliot Katz’s The Poetry and Politics of Allen Ginsberg and get any other Beatdom title for free. Choose from the following recent releases and more: Continue Reading…

John Clellon Holmes’ Existentialist Dilemma

In her essay, “John Clellon Holmes and Existentialism,” Ann Charters leaves the reader with a question: To the degree that Holmes’ thought was influenced by existentialism, was he closer to the position of Sartre or Kierkegaard? Continue Reading…

Ginsberg in the Underground: Whitman, Rimbaud and Visions of Blake

“The thing I understood from Blake was that it was possible to transmit a message through time which could reach the enlightened; that poetry had a definite effect… it was something basic to human existence, it reached the bottom of human existence.” [Ginsberg; Spontaneous Mind; pg 26]

 

It would be easy to say that Allen Ginsberg, in his own personal poetic taste, was always, perhaps unsurprisingly, attracted to rebels – although this spectrum is of course a wide one, when thinking of the world of poetic endeavour. Continue Reading…

Beatdom Goes to North Korea

In May we will release Beatdom #17 – the POLITICS issue. Although we have not yet finalized and announced the essays that will be included in the issue, the submissions received have been of an incredible high standard and we’re certain that this will be the best issue yet.

On the topic of politics, Beatdom editor, David S.Wills, recently visited North Korea and wrote a short essay on a) why we shouldn’t believe what we read in the media, and b) why we shouldn’t judge a country by its government. Read the full story here.

La Strada Translates to The Road

Federico Fellini’s La Strada (1954) is a road movie. The road is not so much an avenue for adventure as it is a means to earn a living, not much of a living, but a way to eat. Zampano, the brute protagonist, a “traveling artist,” and his sidekick, the simple-minded young woman, Gelsomina–he purchased from her poverty-stricken, barefoot-poor mother for 10,000 lire–are existing in war ravaged Italy. Before Gelsomina, Zampano was on the road with her sister Rosa, who died, apparently on the road–no explanation.

Continue Reading…

The Acker Awards 2016

Beatdom Books author, Eliot Katz, who wrote this year’s wonderful The Poetry and Politics of Allen Ginsberg, will be given an award for poetry at the 2016 Acker Awards. Allen Ginsberg and Gregory Corso will be posthumous recipients. The award ceremony will be held at Howl Happening in New York City on March 17th, between 7pm-9pm. Entrance is free.  Continue Reading…

2 Beat Inspired Paintings

 

From the artist: “The painting ‘Faust Fucked Over’  is my take on how the reading of ‘Howl’ over-shadowed (Robert) Duncan’s play, ‘Faust Fantu.’ Always, the locals get over-shadowed by the outsiders.” Continue Reading…

Kerouac Coming to Kindle

On March 22nd, 2016, six of Jack Kerouac’s books will be available as ebooks for the first time. These include his debut novel, The Town and the City. Continue Reading…

Submissions Closed

We will no longer be accepting submissions for Beatdom #17 as the deadline has now passed. Thanks so much to everyone who has sent us material to consider. We will be reviewing submissions during March and April. The volume of material received this time has been tremendous, but we will endeavor to review it all before the end of April.

Here to Go & Back Again: The Lives & Arts of Brion Gysin

If Brion Gysin had not existed, it probably would have been necessary to invent him, as the saying goes. Pre-eminent multimedia psychedelic shaman of the latter-half of the Twentieth Century, Gysin was something of a jack-of-all-trades: Artist, Calligrapher, Entrepreneur, Kinetic Sculptor, Novelist, Performance Artist, Photographer, Poet, Raconteur, Restaurateur, and Traveller in This-and-Other Worlds. Brion did it All. And even a brief list of the names he crossed paths with sounds like a veritable Who’s Who: Laurie Anderson, Francis Bacon, David Bowie, Paul Bowles, Ira Cohen, Ornette Coleman, Max Ernst, Marianne Faithfull, Leonor Fini, Jean Genet, Keith Haring, Billie Holliday, Brian Jones, Timothy Leary, Iggy Pop, Genesis P-Orridge, Patti Smith, Gore Vidal – and, of course, his long-term friend and collaborator, William Burroughs – are among the friends, fellow-travellers and sometimes collaborators that have spoken of their admiration for the Man and his Work. As his biographer, John Geiger, wrote:

“Brion Gysin may be the most influential cultural figure of the Twentieth Century that most people have never heard of.” Continue Reading…