Archives For Beat News

Beat news from the Beatdom blog.

Ginsberg’s Gay Marriage

We at Beatdom would like to congratulate the people of the United States on an event of monumental importance. Today, the Supreme Court voted to make same-sex marriage a right across all states. It is truly a time for celebration. The Beat Generation was, of course, a movement concerned with love and acceptance, and as such I’m sure our readers will be delighted at this news.

Many of  you will know that Allen Ginsberg, who campaigned hard to bring gay rights to public attention, was “married” to Peter Orlovsky – his lover of about forty years. Of course, back 1955 gay marriage was not only illegal, but almost unimaginable in the public consciousness. Yet in February, 1955, at Forster’s Cafeteria in San Francisco, they took an informal set of marriage vows and considered themselves married until Ginsberg’s death in 1997.

The key thing was when we decided on the terms of our marriage—I think it was in Foster’s cafeteria downtown about three in the morning. We were sitting and talking about each other, with each other, trying to figure out what we were going to do, who we were to each other, and what we wanted out of each other, how much I loved him, and how much did he love me. We arrived at what we both really desired. Continue Reading…

The Road Starts in Paterson

“The News from Poems” the Sixth Biennial Conference of the William Carlos Williams Society at William Paterson University ended on a majestic note with a stunning video featuring the music of Frederick Adler, M.D., black-and-white images by the architect and visual artist Jonathan Sinagub, and the words of William Carlos Williams from his epic poem “Paterson,” in a combined work titled “Paterson Project.”


The Road begins in Paterson, as in Sal Paradise’s Paterson, as in WCW’s Paterson, as in Ginsberg’s hometown P-town, New Jersey, as in George Washington’s “coat of Crow-black homespun woven in Paterson,” Alexander Hamilton, yes, that Paterson . . . Paterson of the great Peruvian restaurants and immigrant experience – yes, that Paterson.


Scholars from as far away as Melbourne and Kyoto attended the event.

Olmsted at City Lights

Marc Olmsted, whose memoir, Don’t Hesitate: Knowing Allen Ginsberg, was published through Beatdom Books in 2014, will be reading at City Lights Bookstore in San Francisco next Sunday.

See the City Lights website for more details.

Neal Cassady’s “Joan Anderson Letter” Finally Found

“It was the greatest piece of writing I ever saw, better’n anybody in America, or at least enough to make Melville, Twain, Dreiser, Wolfe, I dunno who, spin in their graves.”

– Jack Kerouac

In 1950, Jack Kerouac read a 16,000 word letter written by his friend and muse, Neal Cassady, that was so revolutionary it caused him to abandon previous attempts at the project that would eventually become On the Road. His new style – later to be dubbed “bop spontaneous prose” – would radically alter literature and culture in the latter half of the twentieth century. Kerouac’s innovation – directly taken from Cassady’s letter – would make his novel, On the Road, one of the most important pieces of literature of the century, going on to influence writers, artists, film-makers, and musicians for decades.

According to Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg – to whom Kerouac loaned the letter – lent it to a friend, Gerd Stern, who dropped it in the ocean and it was lost forever. “It was my property, a letter to me, so Allen shouldn’t have been so careless with it, nor the guy [who dropped it],” a typically belligerent late-60s Kerouac told the Paris Review. Kerouac reportedly wanted the letter to published so that his friend would gain even more counterculture fame than he already had.

However, the disappearance of the letter would appear to have been Ginsberg’s attempt to publish it, rather than a careless mishandling by the sea. It was sent to the offices of Golden Goose Press, who also published Kenneth Rexroth and Robert Creeley, but this publishing company soon shut its doors and the contents of the business were boxed and forgotten. While the intention was to throw everything in the trash, many files were rescued by the operator of a music label who shared the building, and – according to his daughter, who found the letter – couldn’t fathom throwing away someone’s words.

It was a performance artist called Jean Spinosa who found the letter two years ago. It will go on sale December 17th, with most Beat fans hoping that the buyer will make it available to the public. It has become legend in the annals of Beat history and this event is for all Beat enthusiasts truly monumental.

For a great write-up, please visit The Beat Museum website.

Joyce Johnson’s Novels Available From Open Road Media

Joyce Johnson is best-known for her 1983 memoir, Minor Characters, which focuses on the years 1957-58, and concerns the role of the marginalized woman in the Beat sphere. It is ironic, then, that she is often written off as Kerouac’s girlfriend and the woman who wrote about being Kerouac’s girlfriend. Indeed, Johnson is an accomplished novelist in her own right, and an important figure in Beat studies beyond being merely one of the “minor characters.” Her most recent book, The Voice is All: The Lonely Victory of Jack Kerouac, is proof of that.Come and Join the Dance Cover

In 1962, Johnson published her first novel, Come and Join the Dance. She began writing the book a year before meeting Kerouac, and it is considered the first Beat novel written by a woman. Set in 1955, it details the life of a young college graduate in whom Johnson instills the sort of values people thought only the Beat men possessed – a wanderlust, yearning for freedom, sex, and adventure. She said:

“I wanted to write the real way that the girls I knew were living. And it was at a time that there was all this incredible anxiety about having sex, that was the great breakthrough and adventure for a girl – if you could dare to have sex outside your marriage. And so it was about a girl who was in her last week in college and feels that nothing real has ever happened to her, and she decides to lose her virginity. In the 1950s, young women did not write those books.”

Even readers of the Beat Generation may be slightly shocked and surprised, as they are more accustomed to reading about the female participants of the movement as being more reserved in the eyes of their male counterparts. But Johnson’s contributions to Beat studies and, as evidenced in her novels, to the Beat movement itself, have demonstrated that these people were no mere “minor characters,” and were instead sidelined by the history books. Perhaps most recognizable to the Beat enthusiast will be the character Kay, who is based upon the tragic figure of Elise Cowen.

Johnson’s next two novels, Bad Connections (1978) and In the Night Café (1987), are set in the bohemian culture of the 1960s and, like Come and Join the Dance, are located in her native New York City. Written in a crisp, fast-paced prose that exhibits the sort of liberating exuberance that Beat writing was known for, her novels are also tinged with a sadness that is more palpable even than in Kerouac’s or Ginsberg’s writing. Her characters face greater obstacles in their lives and as such are even more beat than their male counterparts, and certainly lack the optimism and hope that existed for the men.

Although these are all fine works of fiction, Johnson has come to be known for her work in non-fiction, and particularly her work in the Beat field. Additionally, her first novel was released only in a run of 1,000 copies. As such, they have previously been hard to come by. Fortunately, Open Road Media has obtained and released these three novels in digital format, with a view to doing “a small paper edition” of Come and Join the Dance. These books are wonderful examples of Beat writing that Beatdom highly recommends. See for more information.

Allen Ginsberg’s Birthday (Suit)

Today would’ve been Allen Ginsberg’s 88th birthday. This is how he celebrated in 1965:

Allen Ginsberg Birthday Suit
“…took off all my clothes at 39th birthday party drunk singing and dancing naked, the Beatles came at midnight and got scared and ran away…”

There is a longer explanation, largely culled from Barry Miles’ retelling, here.



In a brilliant turn of near-poetic irony, Facebook has deleted the above photo. Yes, it violates their terms of service. It was to be expected. But, you have to admire the irony of censoring a man who is most famous for fighting censorship.

Ginsberg once said, “The poet always stands naked before the world,” and he lived by those words. Mark Zuckerberg and his ilk are simply trying to keep Facebook as low-brow as possible, to ensure the idiotic masses are kept rapt by pictures of what their friends had for dinner, or “10 reasons why Kim Kardashian is like so totally fucking important right now.”

Racism is fine.

Sexism is fine.

Homophobia is fine.

The human body? Nope. It’s an outrage!

Their response was typical. Facebook recent changed their page management policies to strangle small businesses, making them invisible to loyal followers, and forcing them to pay for zombie viewers. It’s a giant scam, yet they’re now in the “too big to fail” category. When our post – the above image and quote – hit critical mass and became by far our most successful Facebook post, my (David S. Wills, the editor) Facebook account was deactivated and my IP blocked! When I appealed, I was given this puzzler:

Facebook fuck up

(You may need to click on it and enlarge the image to see just how staggeringly stupid it is…)

Please consider following us on other social media, and be sure to bookmark our website. I have a feeling that Facebook’s war on Beatdom will continue.

This Is How We Die – A Burroughsian Play

Christopher Brett Bailey has written and will perform in a new play, coming to the Oval House in mid-June. We highly recommend that our UK-based readers take a look. Here’s what they say:

Savage, surreal, hypnotic and apocalyptic, THIS IS HOW WE DIE blends spoken word, storytelling, caustic humour and gutter philosophy into a dizzying exorcism of a world that is convinced it is dying.

With echoes of Lenny Bruce, William Burroughs, beat poetry and B-movies, THIS IS HOW WE DIE is a prime slice of surrealist trash and a blood-soaked love letter to the depraved, the depressed and the death-obsessed.

Read more. Also, the playwright’s website.

And here’s the (Naked Lunch-inspired) poster:

Chris BB eflyer

Naropa Turns 40

This Sunday, April 20th, Naropa University – which was founded by Tungpa Rinpoche and was America’s first accredited Buddhist university – turns forty years old. Since the beginning, it included an English department known as the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics, which was founded by Allen Ginsberg and Anne Waldman.

To mark the event there will be a reading at City Lights Bookshop in San Francisco – which has always kept close ties with Naropa and JKS. Included in the reading are Naropa Assistant Professor of English Andrea Rexilius, plus Robert Glück, Juliana Spahr, Cedar Sigo, Eric Baus, Michelle Naka Pierce and Chris Pusateri.

Event Details:

Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics 40th Anniversary Party: 5 p.m. Sunday. Free. City Lights, 261 Columbus Ave., S.F. (415) 362-8193.

Carl Solomon on NOT Publishing Jack Kerouac

The following is from an interview with Carl Solomon, conducted by John Tytell in 1973. John Tytell’s collected interviews (with Ginsberg, Burroughs, Corso, Solomon, and Holmes) and essays on the Beat Generation will be published by Beatdom Books in 2014. Tytell is also the author of Naked Angels (one of the first books that took the Beats seriously as a literary movement) and Paradise Outlaws.


John Tytell: I understand that you were also at one time considering publishing Kerouac.

Carl Solomon: We had paid him an advance of $500, and I had visions of myself as being his Maxwell Perkins[1] and him being my Wolfe because his first novel resembled Wolfe.

JT: I read a letter you wrote to Kerouac at Columbia University Special Collections in which you said that the Wolfean aspect of The Town and the City was a charade that bespoke a repressed surrealism and a repressed homosexuality.

CS: I must have been very erudite in those days.

JT:  What happened with the contract because Kerouac never published with Ace  Books?

CS: Well, we rejected On the Road – he sent us this long scroll. My uncle said it looked like he took it from his trunk.

JT: The teletype roll. Did he get that from Lucien Carr at United Press?

CS: I don’t know where he got it, but we were used to these neat manuscripts, and I thought, “Gee, I can’t read this.”

JT: You didn’t accept it as a surrealistic antic, then?

CS: Because at that time I probably wasn’t into that.


JT: What was Kerouac’s attitude to publishers in general?

CS: Bad! He thought of them as skinflints, and he used the term “Broadway Sams” – he meant Jewish liberal intellectuals. He was snide about anybody who worked in offices.

JT: Was there any problem with getting Kerouac to make revisions?

CS: Yes. He got very angry when I wrote him suggestions.

JT: Did Kerouac send you anything after On the Road?

CS: Then I flipped and was sent to Pilgrim State. But the house continued to deal with him, and they accepted things, and then later reversed themselves.

[1] Considered the most famous literary editor, he worked with F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, and Thomas Wolfe.

CUT UP! An Anthology Inspired by the Cut-Up Method of William S. Burroughs and Brion Gysin

Joe Ambrose Cut upIn Paris in the late Fifties the Beat Generation writer William Burroughs developed the Cut-Up Method. It involved taking a piece of finished text and cutting it into pieces – then rearranging those pieces to create a new text or work of art. Burroughs wrote that: “When you cut into the present the future leaks out.” His creative partner and pal Brion Gysin prophetically declared that: “All words are taped.”

This anthology comes out on the occasion of Burroughs’ 100th birthday.

The cut-up had a profound effect on all media. Devotees of cut-up include David Bowie, Radiohead, and Kathy Acker. Says CUT UP! co-editor Joe Ambrose: “I guess it’s Bowie that really popularized the cut-up, leading to thousands of 70s and 80s youths taking the scissors to their Dad’s Sunday paper. I tried to reach out to Bowie to contribute to the book, via his guitarist Gerry Leonard who is a friend. Gerry put me right in touch with Bowie’s PA but warned me, correctly, that Bowie rarely responded to such requests these days.”Burroughs cut up head

In addition to bringing together new work by new people who’ve emerged from the social media jungle, CUT UP! salutes some better known 20th Century voices who kept the spirit of Burroughs alive. Contributors include Kenji Siratori, Nina Antonia the New York Dolls and Johnny Thunders biographer, Claude Pelieu, Billy Chainsaw, Cabell McLean who was Burroughs’ partner and collaborator, and Nathan Penlington, star of the contemporary London live poetry scene, and Allen Ginsberg.

Says A.D. Hitchin: “We went looking for mostly new and emergent voices. Kenji Siratori, whom I greatly admire, is probably the leading artist working with cut-up right now. Bowie and Denis Cooper both admire him a great deal… And the book reaches right back to the creation of cut-up in the Paris Beat Hotel via the inclusion of Sinclair Beiles – who was in the first cut-up manifesto – Minutes to Go – along with Burroughs, Gysin, and Gregory Corso.”

A.D. Hitchin is an Editor at Oneiros Books and the author of several books including Messages to Central Control. He is a leading contemporary purveyor of the cut-up.

Joe Ambrose has worked with Anita Pallenberg, William Burroughs, Paul Bowles, and Lydia Lunch. He is the author of 14 books including Chelsea Hotel Manhattan and Moshpit Culture.
CUT UP! is available from Oneiros Books at:

Publication Date: 12 April 2014. Further information, images, Kindle review copies etc. contact: