The is NOT an Anthology
Jul13

The is NOT an Anthology

In 1959, the painter, Brion Gysin, “accidentally” cut through a pile of newspapers with a Stanley Knife and changed the future of writing. William S. Burroughs, who would popularize this “cut-up method” would prefer to say that Gysin “cut into the future,” but regardless of semantics – “art is merely a three letter word, my dear” – that which was done could not be undone. Burroughs worked to hone the technique from purely haphazard to...

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The Burroughs File Filed
Jul06

The Burroughs File Filed

It was my husband’s task to pack the books in the garage. Just take the good ones, I said. As I was  unpacking his selection, I came across a 1929 edition of An Anthology of World Poetry edited by Mark  Van Doren (Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg’s Columbia University English professor) and a 1984 copy of  City Lights Books The Burroughs File. I look forward to what I might find in the other two unopened boxes of books, but this is...

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Burroughs: The Movie Interview
Jul02

Burroughs: The Movie Interview

Film director Aaron Brookner discusses the restoration of classic documentary Burroughs: The Movie, made by his late uncle, Howard Brookner. The project coincides with the William S. Burroughs Centennial in 2014. Interview by Tom Cottey. Originally published in Beatdom #14 – the MOVIE issue. Buy it here:     What is your personal connection to Burroughs: The Movie?   I grew up seeing the Burroughs: The Movie...

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Big Bill Bio
Jun22

Big Bill Bio

My brow furrows As I check out big, big book on Burroughs This bio is certainly thorough Old wild American Bill Lee Burroughs Miles and miles Pages and pages It will take ages and ages Bill a mad gray hombre of interest Put life to the testiest test An individual Who jumped through no hoops But walked a strange path of his own In an age of political tyranny Enslavement to government Regulations, restrictions, interference, taxes, and...

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Storming the Reality Studio with Uncle Bill:  Some Thoughts on William S. Burroughs and the Movies
Jun18

Storming the Reality Studio with Uncle Bill: Some Thoughts on William S. Burroughs and the Movies

From Beatdom #14   By Matthew Levi Stevens Art by Philip Willey Until really quite recently, of the “big names” that one thinks of in association with the Beat Generation, it was always William S. Burroughs that was easiest or most likely to think of in connection with film – for a variety of reasons, some fairly obvious and others not so. It is something of a cliché that of the Big Three, each had a decade of which they were very...

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This Is How We Die – A Burroughsian Play
May24

This Is How We Die – A Burroughsian Play

Christopher Brett Bailey has written and will perform in a new play, coming to the Oval House in mid-June. We highly recommend that our UK-based readers take a look. Here’s what they say: Savage, surreal, hypnotic and apocalyptic, THIS IS HOW WE DIE blends spoken word, storytelling, caustic humour and gutter philosophy into a dizzying exorcism of a world that is convinced it is dying. With echoes of Lenny Bruce, William...

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Updates on Beatdom #15 and Beatdom Books
May20

Updates on Beatdom #15 and Beatdom Books

As we move into the latter half of May, only eleven days from the deadline for Beatdom #15, we bring you this image macro, made by the trained monkeys at Beatdom H.Q. It features quotes from the three men hiding in the atomic bomb cloud that lingered over the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Enjoy: If haven’t already, please get your submissions in for Beatdom #15 as soon as possible. There are some details and ideas...

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American Mutants Spawned in the Bunker
May17

American Mutants Spawned in the Bunker

Originally published in Beatdom #14, and excerpted from the forthcoming memoir/scrapbook, Don’t Hesitate: Knowing Allen Ginsberg ’72 Through ’92.   Allen Ginsberg invited me to see William S. Burroughs in January 1977, when I was visiting NYC. As you may know, Burroughs’ residence at 222 Bowery was nicknamed The Bunker. It was a converted YMCA, with literally no windows and a shiny steel door. The walls were...

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