Many Loves
Apr19

Many Loves

by Dr Madhu Mehrotra and Geetanjali Joshi Mishra “Resolved to sing no songs henceforth but those of manly attachment” -Walt Whitman “Longing is a better muse than satisfaction” says Regina Marler the author of ‘Queer Beat: How the Beats turned America onto sex’ and this is very true with regard to the nucleus of the generation which broke all rules of hegemonic, heterosexual, square society, a generation that questioned procreation...

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Gregory Corso: Poet of the Streets
Apr15

Gregory Corso: Poet of the Streets

by James Lough Illustration by Isaac Bonan If the first string of the Beat writers featured Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and William Burroughs, then Gregory Corso was the number one second stringer, an apt metaphor because he loved baseball and wrote about it. When young, in the 1960s, he was a handsome devil, which helped him befriend Allen Ginsberg, who claimed he once seduced Corso. Corso denied it. But Corso’s smooth good looks...

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Loneliness and Waitresses: Tom Waits and Charles Bukowski
Mar29

Loneliness and Waitresses: Tom Waits and Charles Bukowski

By Ardin Lalui Imagine a world without waitresses. Who’d want it? There’s some men have no use for a world like that. For them a life without waitresses is no life at all, no life worth living. Take Tom Waits and Charles Bukowski. Waitresses have left a deep mark on the art of both and have helped shape and add meaning to some of their best work. They have both drawn waitresses as romantic and mysterious. Waitresses have altered the...

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Poetess and Patriarch
Mar01

Poetess and Patriarch

An exploration of female Beat writers and their involvement with the second-wave feminist movement ‘American literature is male. Our literature neither leaves women alone nor allows them to participate… It is not surprising that in it the experience of being American is equated with the experience of being male.’ Judith Fetterley – The Resisting Reader (1978) This introductory quote by Judith Fetterley has been chosen for its...

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Romance & the Rolling Stone
Mar01

Romance & the Rolling Stone

by Michael Hendrick As often as possible, I avoid getting into discussions about Bob Dylan and his body of work. There are a few people who have taken the time to listen and can hold an intelligent conversation but usually the subject either results in one more bad impersonation that is not even vaguely funny or in the implication that the man cannot carry a tune. A very frustrating situation. Dylan was the closing act at Woodstock...

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The Lady is a Humble Thing: Elise Cowen
Mar01

The Lady is a Humble Thing: Elise Cowen

By Karen Baddeley The Lady is a humble thing Made of death and water The fashion is to dress it plain And use the mind for border I remember watching the man I was supposed to marry through my peephole. He had just told me that he was going to marry someone else: a kindergarten teacher from Yonkers, a nice Irish Catholic girl. I am not a kindergarten teacher from Yonkers. He left and trotted down the hall and the stairs. I wondered...

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Carolyn Cassady – Neal, Me and Jack makes three
Mar01

Carolyn Cassady – Neal, Me and Jack makes three

By Spencer Kansa In 1951, Jack Kerouac began work on a roman a clef whose breathless prose would help define an era and seduce generations to come, On the Road. Based on his road trip adventures from the previous decade, Kerouac drew upon his battered notebooks and unique recall to get it all down. Typing on a continuous roll of teletype paper, his stream of consciousness spilled out in one long inspired flow and soon a soulful vision...

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