After the Deluge
Jan04

After the Deluge

“What are you rebelling against?” the local girl asks one of the “saintly motorcyclists” in the 1953 movie The Wild One, and Marlon Brando drawls, “Whaddaya got?” That’s a biography in brief of  French poet Arthur Rimbaud, who revolutionized literature and then abandoned it at age nineteen.   He was born October 20, 1854, in Charleville, France. When he was six, his father, Capt. Frederic Rimbaud, left his wife, two sons, two...

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Grizzly Bear
Nov25

Grizzly Bear

a short story by katy gurin Christine and Jason went to a new friend’s costume party dressed as grizzly bears. They learned to mimic a bear’s loose, muscular, pigeon-toed gait, and they artfully constructed outfits from shaggy fake fur. The couple spent much of their free time preparing for the party by sewing their costumes and watching videos of bears on the internet together. Jason had never seen one outside of a zoo,...

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Dick in Dixie: Hank Williams III
Nov14

Dick in Dixie: Hank Williams III

interview by Michael Hendrick   They say that I’m ill-mannered, that I’m gonna self-destruct, But if you know what I’m thinkin’ you’ll know that pop country really sucks. Well, we’re losing all the outlaws that had to stand their ground and they’re being replaced by these kids from a manufactured town And they don’t have no idea about sorrow and woe ‘Cause they’re all...

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Billy Burroughs: Gentleman Farmer
Nov10

Billy Burroughs: Gentleman Farmer

The notion of Burroughs as a farmer – even an inept one – may not sit right with readers of his work, or those familiar with the history of the Beats. Yet before he was William S. Burroughs the writer, he was Billy Burroughs the farmer, and this period in his life – although largely overlooked by biographers – greatly impacted his literary output. When you look closely at his work, the short period he spent as a farmer in the...

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William Blake and the Beat Generation
Oct30

William Blake and the Beat Generation

William Blake’s influence on the Beat Generation is arguably more significant than that of any other writer or artist. Most notably he was Ginsberg’s “guru” and the “catalyst” for his poetry, and even warranted a mention in “Howl”. Blake supposedly appeared to Ginsberg in 1945 and read “Ah Sun-flower”, and again in 1948 when Ginsberg was reading “The Sick Rose”. He explained, I was never able to figure out whether I was having a...

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Rub Out The Words: Collected Letters 1959-1974
Oct24

Rub Out The Words: Collected Letters 1959-1974

Edited and with an Introduction by Bill Morgan.   At the point this second volume of his Collected Letters opens, William S. Burroughs has been living outside of the USA for the best part of a decade, now settled in the “Beat Hotel” in Paris, and his breakthrough novel Naked Lunch has just been published by the Olympia Press. He was just about to be profiled in Life magazine – the subject of a pained exchange with his...

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The Last Man Standing: Al Hinkle
Oct07

The Last Man Standing: Al Hinkle

The name Al Hinkle should be familiar to most readers of Beatdom, and if it isn’t then they’ll most likely know him by one of the names Jack Kerouac gave him in his novels: Big Ed Dunkel, Slim Buckle, or Ed Buckle. Hinkle and his wife, Helen were good friends of Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg, and Neal Cassady, and feature frequently as characters in a number of Beat Generation texts, including many of Kerouac’s, and also John Clellon...

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Hunter S. Thompson – Gonzo Frontiersman
Sep22

Hunter S. Thompson – Gonzo Frontiersman

Words by Rory Feehan Photos by David S. Wills   “My only faith in this country is rooted in such places as Colorado and Idaho and maybe Big Sur as it was before the war. The cities are greasepits and not worth blowing off the map.” -          Hunter S. Thompson (from a letter to Lionel Olay,February 16, 1962) Hunter S. Thompson is a name that will always be associated with a variety of locations – from his birthplace of...

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