Tech Troubles

This website was hit by a major attack on Monday night. All 1,000 posts, 2,000 images, and 9 years of work were wiped out. We have been so far unable to recover the data and will most likely have to build a new site from scratch. This could take weeks. Please be patient, and follow Beatdom on Facebook, Tumblr, or Twitter to keep up to date with our progress. Thanks for understanding.

*UPDATE: It has proven impossible to recover the lost data. We will attempt to add all major articles from previous issues of Beatdom. This is going to take a long time. We will start with recent posts and work our way back, but a huge amount of material will prove impossible to replace.

The Joan Anderson Letter Goes to Auction

Almost two years ago the world of Beat studies was rocked by the discovery of a seemingly lost piece of history: the fabled Joan Anderson Letter. Written by Neal Cassady and sent to Jack Kerouac, the letter played a pivotal role in American literary history, only to supposedly be lost overboard into the cold Pacific Ocean. Continue Reading…

Harold Norse Centennial

July 6, 2016 marks the hundredth anniversary of the birth of master American poet Harold Norse. Known for his association with Beat literature and gay liberation, Norse’s work retains its pertinence in today’s fractured world of politics and despair. This has been reflected by increased attention to Norse’s legacy from The New York Times to the International Times. Continue Reading…

Harold Norse­– Brooklyn’s Bastard Angel

Though largely overlooked in the study of Beat literature, Harold Norse remains a potent and prophetic figure in Twentieth Century poetics. As this year marks the centennial of his birth (July 6, 1916), it’s a fitting time to look back at the Bastard Angel from Brooklyn. The focus of politics in this issue of Beatdom offers a unique opportunity to examine Norse’s examine Norse’s life and poetry through the lens of his experience as an illegitimate child and a queer. Continue Reading…

My Favorite Playmate: A Daughter’s Loving Tribute to Neal Cassady

“He looks so old!” was my first thought as the hospital elevator doors parted, revealing my dad.  I was aghast at the vision before me. He appeared to have aged twenty years since I’d seen him the year before. His skin was weathered and tanned, his clean-shaven face was wrinkled and worn, and his neatly combed hair was wispy and sparse. Despite the grin on Dad’s face, his faded blue eyes disclosed the harsh life he’d been leading. If I hadn’t known his age (41), I would’ve guessed he was at least 70 years old. Seeing him like that broke my heart.

Continue Reading…

Beatdom #17 Now on Sale

We are delighted to announce the release of Beatdom #17 – the POLITICS issue. This latest issue marks the ninth anniversary of the founding of Beatdom Literary Journal – a great milestone for a small publication. This time we’re bringing you essays related to the topic of politics and literature, with a focus on Beat writers who are less frequently featured in the pages of Beatdom.  Continue Reading…

The Politics of the Wild Boys

In anticipation of Beatdom #17 – the POLITICS issue – we’re releasing this one-off free PDF download of The Politics of the Wild Boys, in which David Depestel explores the complex politics in some of William S. Burroughs’ best books. Continue Reading…

The Complicated Politics of the Beat Triumvirate

There is much about the Beat Generation that is shrouded in confusion. Oftentimes it stems from wishful thinking on the part of Beat scholars and readers, and sometimes it emerges from the haze between the myths the Beats themselves created and their own reality. Partly, though, the confusion arises from the simple fact that the politics of the three best-known Beat Generation authors was in fact rather complicated, and no amount of simplification can detract from that fact. Allen Ginsberg was the face of the left for much of the late twentieth century, but was he was also critical of much of the left. Jack Kerouac was the hero of the left in the sixties, yet his personal politics then veered hard right. And William S. Burroughs… Well, his ideas concerning politics involve space travel, engrams, and word viruses. Continue Reading…

Review: Ambiguous Borderlands

In his new book, Ambiguous Borderlands: Shadow Imagery in Cold War American Culture, Dr. Erik Mortenson looks at the “paradox” of mid-twentieth century life in the United States, where there were unprecedented levels of comfort for many citizens, and yet the impending threat of nuclear holocaust. While people became wealthier than ever before, there came also a crushing pressure to conform or fit in with mainstream society. Mortenson argues, Continue Reading…

John Clellon Holmes’ Existentialist Dilemma

In her essay, “John Clellon Holmes and Existentialism”, Ann Charters leaves the reader with a question:  To the degree that Holmes’ thought was influenced by existentialism, was he closer to the position of Sartre or Kierkegaard?  The main theme of this essay is to answer the question we are left with after reading Charter’s discussion of Holmes’ existentialism. (1) Continue Reading…